Israel mustn't allow Egypt to unilaterally void obligations to their own advantage

Reader comment on: Egypt Fully Remilitarizing Sinai - with US Help

Submitted by Raymond in DC (United States), Aug 20, 2012 22:55

If the military restrictions in the peace treaty are to be modified to cope with increasing threats within the Sinai, such modifications need not and should not be only in Egypt's favor. Israel could, for example, demand in return reconnaissance rights and the right of hot pursuit. In that way Israel keeps tabs on Egyptian activities as well as those of groups preparing attacks, and puts attackers on notice they can't simply jump back across the border and be considered untouchable. It also puts Egypt on notice that it has no right to make unilateral changes to an agreement.


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Other reader comments on this item

Title By Date
Changes are caused by the changes in Cairo [401 words]Jerry BlazAug 22, 2012 18:55
Now Obama scrapes Camp David [72 words]ArtAug 22, 2012 07:55
⇒ Israel mustn't allow Egypt to unilaterally void obligations to their own advantage [99 words]Raymond in DCAug 20, 2012 22:55
Trust and confidence [236 words]HansAug 20, 2012 18:10

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